Katas

"SeiSan will unlock the secrets of SanChin; SanSeiRyu will unlock the secrets of SeiSan; SanChin will unlock the secrets of SanSeiRyu."


            Pangai-Noon uses katas as the primary means of transmitting the technique. The word Kata ? in Japanese translates into a pattern, form, style or model. It is through studying these prearranged patterns of movements that a person is able to learn this style of martial art.
            The katas teach the students technique and build understanding of the human body, both their own and others. It is through the constant repetition that the body learns muscle memory. At first, the student feels awkward, and self-conscious, in a state of "beginners mind" (Shoshin). As the body memorizes the proper forms, they pass through a state of "no thought" (Munen) and end up at a state of "no mind" (Mushin). The end result is that the body is able to utilize the learned movement from the katas with little or no thought.
            In the beginning, new katas are learned in the Dojo, under the supervision of upper students and the Sensei. Once the student has learned enough of the kata, then it can be taken out of the Dojo and practiced at any time. This allows for the student to continue their training and increase their understanding on their own, and class time can be spent on critiquing and correcting, as well as studying the practical application of what the kata has to offer.
            It is important to keep in mind that Katas are a perfect world scenario. There is no time that the entire Kata would be used in a situation from beginning to end. Rather pieces of the Kata would be pulled out and used in each applicable situation.

SanChin (三戦):

In Mandarin Chinese, the name translated into Three Battles or Three Fights. Often the three represent the Mind, Body and Spirit. It is the first of the three core katas.

SeiSan (十三):

In Mandarin Chinese, the name translates into Thirteen. The name brakes down into Sei = ten, San = three: ten + three = thirteen. It is the second of the three core katas.

DainiSeiSan (第二十三):

The name of this kata means second thirteen battles. The name brakes down into Dai = prefix to order numbers, Ni = two, Sei = ten, San = three. The Crane, one of the three patron animals of Pangai-Noon, is represented in this kata.

KanShabu (漢子知):

This is a blending of Kanbun Uechi (上地 完文) and ShuuShabu's names. The Tiger, the second of the three patron animals of Pangai-Noon, is represented in this kata. This kata is also known as KanShiwa, using the name Shushiwa.

Nunchucku (ヌンチャク):

This is the first of the two weapons katas. It utilizes two short, usually octagonal shaped wood rods held together by a short piece of rope.

SeiChin (十戦):

In Mandarin Chinese, the name translated into Ten Battles. The Dragon, the third of the three patron animals of Pangai-Noon, is represented in this kata.

SeiRyu (十六):

In Mandarin Chinese, the name translates into Sixteen. The name brakes down into Sei = ten, Ryu (liu) = six: ten + six = sixteen.

KanChin (完戦):

This kata takes its name Kanbun Uechi (上地 完文), and chin which translates into battle. Put it all together and the name translates into Kanban’s battle.

Bo ():

This is the second of the two weapons katas. It uses a rod of wood, no longer than the person performing the kata is tall.

SanSeiRyu (三十六):

In Mandarin Chinese, the name translates into Thirty-six. The name brakes down into San = three, Sei (Shi) = ten, Ryu (liu) = six: (three x ten) + six = 36. It is the third of the three core katas.

            Each school has a different amount of katas that students are required to learn. Some Sensei focus on the core three and weapons katas while others focus on all ten. Each school has different training requirements, but the katas are studied with the same intensity regardless of the number of them taught. The study of those katas continues for the duration of the life of the practitioner. At no time should anyone allow themselves to fall under the delusion that they have mastered any of the Katas. No matter how well a person does, there is always room to improve, and there is always new technique to uncover.